FAQ

Neutering should be considered if you are keeping any male dog as a pet. Remember that Guide Dogs for the Blind, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, and Dogs for the Disabled are routinely neutered, and this does not impair their ability to perform their duties.

Reduces the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis

Reduces the risk of hormone-related diseases such as perianal adenoma

Eliminates the risk of testicular cancer, the second most common cancer in intact dogs

Removes sexual urges, which usually decreases roaming behaviors

Reduces certain types of aggression

Neutering may be used in an attempt to treat certain forms of aggression. In older dogs, the operation may be performed to treat testicular tumors and some prostate gland conditions. It is also used to control hormonal (testosterone) dependent diseases such as perianal adenomas.

Most of the perceived disadvantages are false. The most quoted of these are that the dog will become fat, lazy, and useless as a guardian. Obesity is probably the most commonly quoted disadvantage of neutering. In most cases, obesity is the result of overfeeding and not exercising enough. By regulating your dog's diet and caloric intake, you can prevent obesity in both neutered and intact males.

Neutering doesn't cause a change in personality, guarding instincts, intelligence, playfulness and affection.

Most veterinarians recommend neutering at around six months of age. However, neutering at an earlier age, which is a common practice at animal shelters, does not appear to be detrimental.

Neutering is considered a major operation and requires general anesthesia. With any anesthetic the risk of serious complications, including death, is always present. However, with modern anesthetics and monitoring equipment, the risk of a complication is very low. It has been said that your pet has a greater chance of being injured in a car wreck than having an anesthetic or surgical complication.

Your pet will be examined by a veterinarian and pre-anesthetic blood tests will usually be performed . If everything is acceptable, your pet will be anesthetized. Most pets will have an intravenous catheter placed to administer the anesthetic and to provide fluid therapy during the surgery. After your pet is anesthetized, a breathing tube will be placed in his trachea or "windpipe" to deliver oxygen and gas anesthetic directly into the lungs. The surgery consists of making a small incision in front of the scrotum and removing the testicles. At Avon Animal Hospital in surrey our  veterinarians can use absorbable internal sutures so that you do not have to return your dog to the hospital to have them removed.

"Rest and restriction of activity are the primary post-operative care you should provide."

Rest and restriction of activity are the primary post-operative care you should provide. Most dogs can resume normal activity five to ten days after surgery. Until then, leash walks, lots of rest, and no swimming, bathing, running or climbing stairs are the rule.

Our Veterinarian at Avon Animal Hospital in surrey are providing dog neutering services to dogs and cats in surrey , Langley and surrounding area. Call us to set up the appointment.

Pet parents often worry that their dog is too old for anesthesia. This is a huge misconception that prevents many dogs from getting the surgery they need. As we often say, “age is not a disease.”

That said, we do not take anesthesia lightly in patients of any age, and certain precautions should be taken for senior dogs. Here are 7 facts that may help you feel more secure when your senior needs anesthesia:

According to a study posted by the the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), the average death rate under anesthesia is around 0.2%. Said otherwise, an average of 99.8% of pets, regardless of their age or health status, survive anesthesia.

There is no "one size fits all" anesthesia dosage. Anesthesia drugs are chosen and calculated based on body weight, health issues, breed, temperament and even anticipated length of anesthesia and pain involved with the surgery. We now have the luxury of choosing from multiple anesthesia drugs, depending on the pet’s particular needs.

A thorough physical exam should be performed on every patient prior to anesthesia. In addition, what is called a “full workup” helps vets understand the "overall picture." This includes blood work and a urinalysis. Such tests will show any changes in the function of organs, such as the liver or the kidneys. 

Chest X-rays may be recommended. They will show the size of the heart and if there are any masses or concerning changes in the lungs. In order to know how well the heart is functioning, an EKG can be performed.

Blood work abnormalities, diabetes, thyroid disease, high or low blood pressure, Cushing’s disease, heart disease and other conditions should be controlled prior to anesthesia, if at all possible. This may not be possible in all cases, for example in the case of a life-threatening emergency. But in most cases, when vets have the luxury of time, we can correct abnormalities to make the anesthesia smoother.

For example, if your dog has a low red blood cell count, a blood transfusion, prior to anesthesia and surgery, may be important.

Deciding when the time is right to perform anesthesia is part of the art of veterinary medicine.

“There are routine surgeries, but there is no routine anesthesia.” What does this common quote, invented by an anesthesiologist, mean? 

Some surgeries are so common, that they become fairly predictable. However, with anesthesia, you are always at the mercy of an unpredictable complication. Fortunately, a good surgery and anesthesia team can anticipate and correct complications. Most complications are minor and easy to correct.

Proper monitoring is an essential part of anesthesia. Monitoring includes keeping a close eye on breathing, heart rate, temperature, EKG, and oxygen level. Ideally it will also include watching blood pressure and CO2 levels.

Small changes can be seen right away. They help the doctor or nurse adjust the anesthesia to keep your dog in safe ranges. Some dogs may require additional monitoring such as diabetics, who should have their blood sugar level checked throughout the procedure.

Most clients are not aware that, as found on the NCBI website, the recovery period is actually riskier than the anesthesia period itself. More dogs get in trouble after they wake up, then when they are under anesthesia. Monitoring, and encouraging dogs to wake up smoothly will still involve the surgery and anesthesia team. Make sure that your dog will continue to be supervised after waking up from anesthesia.

Overall, dogs do great under anesthesia, regardless of their age or health status. Remember, we put dogs under anesthesia for good reasons: perhaps cleaning teeth, removing a tumor, or correcting laryngeal paralysis. As I always say, "anesthesia is not the enemy, the disease is the enemy."

If you are still concerned about your dog’s anesthesia, ask your veterinarian to consult with a board-certified anesthesiologist who can advise you of the safest anesthesia drugs and protocol.

If you have any questions or concerns, you should always visit or call us at 604-532-7600.

Our Veterinarians at Avon Animal Hospital in Surrey will Discuss all the questions feel free to set up appointment for your pet. We are providing veterinary services in surrey, Langley since 2003

Vaccine is a injection of a killed or attenuated (weakened) virus or bacteria in order to stimulate the immune system to produce antibodies to that particular disease, so when that kind of bacteria or virus attacks the pet and those antibodies fight that particular virus or bacteria to prevent the pet from that disease.

Our Veterinarian at Avon animal hospital in surrey always explains different kind of vaccine information which creates awareness for owner then they can know what kind and how often there pet needs vaccination. Our Animal hospital in Langley, surrey area is providing these “dog Vaccination” , “Cat vaccination”, “Puppy vaccination” and “Kitten vaccination” since 2003.

For owners that are uncomfortable with vaccinating their pets for any reason, titer testing is available. Titer testing is a blood test that tests for the active antibodies in a pet’s bloodstream as a means to determine if the pet has immunity to certain diseases or needs vaccine again.

Rabies: A fatal viral disease that can infect warm blooded animals, including dogs and humans. After 12 weeks of age all dogs are required by law to have a one year rabies vaccination. Boosters is given after one year and then every three year in Canada .

DAPP (Distemper, Adenovirus, Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus): All are serious, contagious and sometimes fatal diseases that can affect major organs.

 Distemper is a contagious viral disease that affects the respiratory and nervous system of dogs. Distemper does not cause "bad temper." It is a serious illness that is almost always fatal. This is highly contagious viral disease that may spread quickly from dog to dog. Symptoms can include:

  • listlessness
  • fever
  • coughing
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • discharge from eyes and nose.

In it’s final stages it may cause convulsions and paralysis. Death can occur in one to three weeks.

Hepatitis is a viral infectious disease that affects the liver and eyes and may cause reproductive problems. Hepatitis is not contagious to people. This virus is spread between dogs by contact with there urine, feces and other secretions from infected animals.

Parvovirus is one of the most serious contagious diseases for puppies . Parvovirus causes severe vomiting and diarrhea while suppressing the immune system and may be fatal even if treated.

Signs; Signs and symptoms:

  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • dehydration
  • Fever
  • Pain
  • Loss of appetite

Bordetella is one of the bacterial causes of "kennel cough" Signs like a honking cough during the night can be stressful for the dog as well as the owner. The first time your pet gets this vaccine it will be a two part series. After the initial dose they will have to come back in 3-4 weeks to get the booster. After the booster is given they will be protected for a whole year. If your pet gets boarded regularly check with the boarding facility - some require this vaccine to be given semi-annually.

Canine Influenza (“kennel cough”) – A highly contagious respiratory infection of dogs that is caused by an influenza A virus. If your pet regularly frequents areas where groups of dogs congregate – dog park, day care, grooming/boarding facility – please discuss your dog’s risk of exposure with our veterinarian at Avon animal hospital in surrey .and if the Canine Influenza vaccine is appropriate for your dog. If your dog gets boarded regularly or is in daycare, please check with the facility – some require this vaccine. The first time your pet gets this vaccine it will be a two part series. After the initial dose they will have to come back in 3 – 4 weeks to get the booster. After the booster is given they will be protected for a whole year. You can start this vaccine at 8 week of age too. Parainfluenza is passed from dog to dog and can be fatal. This disease is highly contagious in all ages of a dog’s life. Symptoms may include:

  • dry hacking cough
  • fever
  • difficulty breathing
  • runny nose
  • sneezing
  • runny eyes
  • depression
  • loss of appetite
  • lethargy

Leptospirosis - Leptospirosis is a bacterial infectious disease that causes severe liver and kidney damage and may also affect humans. Dogs can get this disease from wild life like Raccoons, Squirrels, skunks etc. that has contaminated puddles, ponds, lakes, soils. Leptospirosis is Zoonotic Disease which means humans can get form dogs too if they get that. This cause liver and kidney damage in pets’ .The first time your pet gets this vaccine it will be a two part series. After the initial dose they will have to come back in 3-4 weeks to get the booster. After the booster is given they will be protected for a whole year.  You can start this vaccine at 8 week of age too.

Lyme Disease – If you take your dog in any wooded or bushy area where they can get a tick , they are at risk of getting Lyme disease which can damage joints and kidneys. The first time your pet gets this vaccine it will be a two part series. After the initial dose they will have to come back in 3-4 weeks to get the booster. After the booster is given they will be protected for a whole year.

Rabies: A fatal viral disease that can infect warm blooded animals, including dogs and humans. After three months of age all dogs are required by law to have a one year rabies vaccination. . Boosters is given after one year and then every three year .

FVRCCP: This vaccine protects against rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, chlamydia and panleukopenia which are transmitted by saliva, mucus and other secretions of acutely ill cats. Feline panleukopenia virus, also commonly referred to as feline distemper, is a highly contagious and life threatening viral disease in the cat population.

Feline Leukemia: The feline leukemia virus can infect cats by saliva or nasal discharge, biting, or sharing food and water dishes. Feline leukemia virus adversely affects the cats body in many ways. It is the most common cause of cancer in cats. It may cause various blood disorders, and it may lead to a state of immune deficiency that hinders the cat’s ability to protect itself against other infections

1st:8 week Vaccine-Exam + DAPV

2nd:12 week Vaccine-Exam + DAPV -other options include Leptospirosis, and Bordetella (Kennel Cough),Lyme vaccine

3rd:16 week Vaccine-Exam + DAPV (1 year vaccine), other options include 2nd Leptospirosis Booster (1 year vaccine),bordetella booster, Lyme booster Rabies (1 year vaccine)

This would complete the dog vaccinations schedule your puppy needs ensure that he or she is vaccinated against common canine diseases. So your pet can stay happy and healthy. Then after that vaccines are done annually.

* Please do not socialize your cat with unvaccinated cats until kitten vaccines are complete*

  • 1st Vaccines 8 week:Exam + Fvrccp +Deworming +flea treatment
  • 2nd Vaccines 12 weeks:Exam + TRICAT, Leukemia, Rabies
  • 3rd Vaccine is 2nd dose of Leukemia 

This would complete the vaccines your kitten needs ensure that he or she is vaccinated against common feline diseases. After doing this vaccine your pet can start healthy life. The next vaccinations are due in 1 year

*No vaccine has a 100% guarantee, though your pet has less chance of disease or illness when following a proper vaccine schedule and giving your pets  proper nutrition, exercise, and a properly sanitary living environment. Please contact us if you have any questions or if you would like to book a Vaccination call us at 604-532-7600 or email us at avonvet@yahoo.ca

Our Veterinarian at Avon Animal hospital recommend spaying all female pets. The benefits to your pet's health and to help reduce the pet overpopulation crisis make this decision easier. It should be remembered that owners of Guide Dogs for the Blind, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People and Dogs for the Disabled routinely have their dogs spayed and this does not affect their ability to perform their duties in any manner whatsoever.

Prevention of "heat" or estrus

When in "heat", the female experiences an urge to escape in order to find a mate. This unwanted and dangerous behavior is eliminated.

Elimination of the hormone fluctuations that cause false pregnancy following the "heat cycle"

Prevention of uterine infection known as pyometra

Prevention of breast cancer. Dogs spayed before their first "heat" have less than 0.5% chance of developing breast cancer.

Elimination of the risk of uterine and ovarian cancer

The operation may be performed for several medical conditions. These include:

Treatment of intractable false or phantom pregnancy

Treatment of irregular or abnormal cycles due to ovarian cysts

Treatment of uterine infection (pyometra) or cancer

Dystocia (difficult birthing) or post caesarean-section surgery

An aid to correction of certain behavioral abnormalities

Most of the perceived disadvantages are false. The most quoted of these are that the dog will become fat, lazy, and useless as a guard dog. Obesity is probably the most commonly quoted disadvantage of spaying. Obesity is the result of overfeeding and lack of physical activity. The role of female hormones in preventing obesity is poorly understood. By regulating your dog's diet and caloric intake, you can prevent obesity in neutered or intact females.

Spaying doesn't cause a change in personality, guarding instincts, intelligence, playfulness or affection.

"Spaying doesn't cause a change in personality, guarding instincts, intelligence, playfulness or affection."

Most veterinarians recommend spaying between four and six months of age. Spaying at an earlier age, which is a common practice at animal shelters, does not appear to be detrimental.

Not at the present time, although there are several promising advances being made in this area, including the development of novel vaccines.

Spaying is considered a major operation and requires general anesthesia. With any anesthetic the risk of serious complications, including death, is always possible. With modern anesthetics and monitoring equipment, the risk of a complication is very low. It has been said that your pet has a greater chance of being injured in a car wreck than having an anesthetic or surgical complication.

Your pet will be examined by a veterinarian and pre-anesthetic blood tests will usually be performed. If everything is acceptable, your pet will be anesthetized. Most pets will have an intravenous catheter placed to administer the anesthetic and to provide fluid therapy during the surgery. After your pet is anesthetized, a breathing tube will be placed in her trachea or windpipe. This will allow the delivery of oxygen and gas anesthetic directly into the lungs. The surgery consists of making an incision just below the umbilicus and removing both the ovaries and uterus. Many veterinarians use absorbable sutures so that you do not have to return to have them removed.

"Rest and restriction of activity are the primary post-operative care you should provide."

Rest and restriction of activity are the primary post-operative care you should provide. Most dogs can resume normal activity five to ten days after surgery. Until then, leash walks, lots of rest, and no running or climbing stairs are the rule.

 I have heard that letting my dog have one litter will calm her down.

There is no scientific evidence that having puppies has any calming psychological effect. This myth has no basis in fact.

treatment

LASER SUGERIES

At avon animal hospital our veterinarians offer Laser Surgeries for spay ,neuter and other soft tissue surgeries which reduces blood lost, pain and discomfort in your pet

treatment

FLEA CONTROL

our animal clinic offer fea control to pets in area of surrey , langley , aldergrove.Now get upto 30% discount on flea control for your dogs and cats

treatment

SICK PET?BUSY DAY?

AT Avon Animal clinic our cat and dog doctors Serving your pets since 2003,Treating your pets like family.Try our pet drop off service